Editorial #124

We have just experienced, what in my opinion is, the most beautiful season of the year: autumn. When the leaves are at its most colorful stage, brightly orange, falling to the ground to prepare the trees for winter. Walking past Lund university library, I think even the most pro-summer person would agree with me, when…

Axel Schennings Avatar

We have just experienced, what in my opinion is, the most beautiful season of the year: autumn. When the leaves are at its most colorful stage, brightly orange, falling to the ground to prepare the trees for winter. Walking past Lund university library, I think even the most pro-summer person would agree with me, when they see the red vine clinging to the Harry Potter-like building’s facade.

This made me think about how much time there really is left of the semester. It is like a month or so before everyone starts traveling back to their home cities to celebrate christmas, and after that there is a new year. Time goes by so fast, off course a typical cliché, but it is true. For me, it feels like I just began studying in Lund at the bachelor program at LUSEM, and now, already, my third semester is almost over. I will soon hand in my application for an exchange in term five, and after that it is not long before I have to start my career. Or carry on with it, might be a more proper way of phrasing it.

I think that pretty much everyone share these feelings. Many people are hesitant about leaving the ideal life that you experience in Lund, with constant possibility to party, to meet new friends, to relax and manage your own time and not have anyone telling you what to do. Autumn is that friendly reminder that the party soon will be over. A transistion period from the crazy days of summer to harsh winter.

For this issue, I made an interview with an auditing company. I met with them at their office and we chatted for about an hour, and on my way back to Lund, I found myself being in a very cheerful mood. I asked myself why, and I could not really figure it out, but later in the evening it struck me; I really enjoyed being back at an office.

After finishing school at the age of 19, I worked for two years in accounting, and when leaving to go to school, I knew it had been a great experience and that I had had great collegues, but mostly I was glad that I was going to start studying. Though, when looking back at it now, after the interview with the auditing company, I remember how fun it was at most times. I got to take so much responsibility, to learn about a business, to work with and meet people on a professional level. It was great. It is great.

Leaving Lund will be tough since this has been, and is by far, the best period of my life. But I will get through it, knowing that something exciting will be waiting for me on the other side of the tunnel. One of the most interesting series of articles we feature here in Lundtan, in my opinion, is the Alumni column. For comfort in the matter above, I suggest you read those interviews. I mean, if it worked out for those guys, it should work out for you and me as well. Right?

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Founded in 1948 and has since been an important part of student life in the economics program at Lund University. Nådiga Lundtan covers a wide range of topics related to economics, society, and politics, as well as careers, entrepreneurship, and innovation. It is a platform for students to share their ideas and opinions on economics and related fields.

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